Marge Pitrof

News Director

Marge has been with WUWM since it changed formats from music to news and information in the late 1980’s. Searching for a place where she could produce in-depth journalism, Marge was hired by WUWM as a reporter. For several years, Marge also hosted Morning Edition.

While a reporter, Marge was a frequent contributor to NPR and won numerous awards for her work.

Since fall of 2000, Marge has been managing the news department but still has the occasional opportunity to produce stories.

Prior to joining WUWM, Marge worked in commercial radio both as an afternoon news anchor and a field reporter. She also worked for short periods at a few TV stations.

» Contact WUWM News

All Republicans on the Legislature's Joint Finance Committee voted in favor of the changes, all Democrats voted against them. The budget plan would cut funding for the University of Wisconsin System by $250 million over the next two years, rather than the $300 million Gov. Walker wanted.

The budget committee agreed with Walker to eliminate the state law protecting tenure or indefinite status for faculty. Instead, the appointed UW Board of Regents would determine who is granted tenure.

When a girl was stabbed 19 times in a Waukesha park last May, the suspects were 12 years old, so under state law, they head directly to adult court. The judge will decide whether they belong there or in juvenile court.

The girls told police they stabbed a classmate to please a fictitious character named Slender Man. The victim survived.

Wisconsin changed its juvenile code in the 1990s, lowering the age at which a defendant goes to adult court, from 18 to 17. Former Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Janine Geske says attitudes had changed.

UPDATE: A photo of Willie Bedford has been found and confirmed. It means Wisconsin has obtained photographs of all its 1,161 soldiers who died in the Vietnam War.

Searchers had hoped to find all of them by Memorial Day, but Bedford remained particularly elusive. He attended high school in MPS, and perhaps the stumbling block was that his high school yearbook listed him as B. Bedford.

Republican Sen. Van Wanggaard and Rep. Joel Kleefisch invited city officials to an informational hearing on Wednesday, to explain a computer malfunction affecting the Milwaukee Police Department. The problem has resulted in several videotaped interrogations being inaccessible.

The two GOP legislators chair committees related to public safety and criminal justice, but Milwaukee Democrats accused the two of calling the hearing simply to slug the city politically.

Democrat Sen. Fred Risser kicked-off the meeting with a question.

Creative Commons

The owners of the property are selling it for $12.8 million, touting its location along the Menomonee River as a prime site for development.

The U.S. Postal Service has leased the building since 1970.

It includes one-million square feet of space and covers nine acres.

Next door, is the Milwaukee Intermodal Station, a transportation hub for rail and bus.

Former Wisconsin Sen. Russ Feingold, a Democrat, will run in 2016 for the seat he lost to Republican Sen. Ron Johnson.

He made the announcement via a video on his website.

Feingold served three terms, starting in 1993, before Johnson ousted him in a midterm election in 2010 by five percentage points. Most recently, the 62-year-old Feingold has been teaching at Stanford.

Wisconsin people receiving food benefits would have to spend at least 67 percent of them on healthy foods, while certain items would be banned, under a bill the Assembly approved Wednesday.

The prohibited items would include crab, lobster and shrimp.

The bill now moves to the state Senate, which did not consider a similar bill last session.

Any such changes to the FoodShare program in Wisconsin would have to be approved by the federal government - because it funds the program.  So far, the USDA has not given any state permission to impose such restrictions.

Gov. Walker has asked legislators to abandon his proposal to merge WEDC and WHEDA, the Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority.

The Legislative Audit Bureau released a study Friday morning indicating that the public-private Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation, WEDC, has not complied with Wisconsin law.

Republicans, Sen. Mary Lazich of New Berlin and Rep. Jesse Kremer of Kewaskum introduced their bill on Thursday, saying they want to prevent unborn children from feeling pain.

Under their proposal, the state would charge doctors with a felony for performing an abortion on a woman more than 20 weeks pregnant, if the case is not an emergency. Penalties could include a three-year prison term or a $10,000 fine.

Gov. Walker says he would sign the bill, if it reaches his desk.

Wisconsin's State Capitol
Ann Althouse, Flickr

State leaders had hoped additional tax money would enable them to restore funding for public schools and reduce a proposed $300 million cut to the UW System.

But, according to projections from the Legislative Fiscal Bureau, there will be no extra revenue over the next two years.

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